February 23, 2024—The public is invited to join artists Ellen Holtzblatt and Mary Porterfield for a conversation with Miller Art Museum Curator Helen del Guidice at 4pm Friday, March 1. An audience Q&A will follow the conversation as will a free public reception from 5:30 – 7pm. Light refreshments will be provided with music provided by Craig Schultz and Mike Miller.

The Studio Door VestigesCurrently on view at the Miller Art Museum, the artist’s two-person exhibit, Vestiges of the Tide, explores each artist’s unique approach to the sensitive topic of senescence through exquisitely rendered drawings and paintings. Porterfield works in the medical field as an occupational therapist and is also a talented portraitist committed to rendering her elderly, infirm subjects with images that address recurring struggles in healthcare. In unison, Ellen Holtzblatt presents works from her Song of Songs series, a collection of portraits of her elderly mother that convey that love, desire, and the need for human contact are universal. The exhibition is emotionally charged and offers viewers a powerful, poetic experience of a reality that many in Door County face.

February 2, 2024—The Miller Art Museum will reveal a new exhibition on Wednesday, February 14, 2024, titled 'CREATIVE POWER,' presented in collaboration with ARTS for ALL Wisconsin. The exhibit follows 'Charles L. Peterson in the Permanent Collection,' which features 19 works by the nationally recognized maritime artist Charles L. Peterson (1927 - 2022). The final day to view the work of Peterson is Monday, February 12; museum hours are 10am – 7pm. 

'CREATIVE POWER' is a traveling exhibition that provides public recognition of hundreds for individuals in the State of Wisconsin with disabilities each year. The work, comprised of a variety of media, seeks to center the creative expressions, experiences, and perspectives of artists living and working throughout the state, generating public awareness of disability and providing a critical representation of disabled voices. ArtsforAll image

“We share the work of artists because we believe that art is a universal and essential language that challenges people to respond to the world, look beyond themselves, and celebrate diversity by building bridges between people, across cultures, and through generations. We also believe that art can be a tool for healing,” writes ARTS for ALL Wisconsin.

'CREATIVE POWER' is developed and administered by ARTS for ALL Wisconsin (AFA), a nonprofit founded in 1985 dedicated to expanding the capabilities, confidence, and quality of life for children and adults with disabilities through the arts. The collection comprises artwork selected annually from AFA’s CREATIVE POWER call for art. The artists range in age from youth to adult who experience a variety of physical, cognitive, and sensory disabilities. Each award-winning work included in the collection spends three years traveling throughout the state.

“Representation for people of all abilities is critically important, says Helen del Guidice, curator. “The Miller Art Museum is committed to providing a platform for all artists, ensuring these very unique and vibrant voices are seen by our communities in NE Wisconsin.”

The exhibition will be on view on the Ruth Morton Miller Mezzanine through April 6, 2024.

January 19, 2024—The Miller Art Museum today announced that applications are open for its 2024 Dome House Al & Mickey Quinlan Artist Residency program. After three successful years of welcoming four visual artists from across the Midwest, the Museum, in partnership with the Quinlan/Wagner family, is thrilled to once again open the doors of the iconic Dome House to a new artist in 2024. The deadline to apply is Friday, April 5, 2024.

DomeHouseCall2024The Dome House Al & Mickey Quinlan Artist Residency was established in 2021 and has served four Midwest artists in its inaugural years. If selected for the 2024 program, one artist will be provided with an 8-week opportunity to reside at the Dome House, a twin-lobed (one side for a residence, the other for a studio) domed concrete structure built into sand dunes abutting Whitefish Dunes State Park and situated on the shores of Lake Michigan. The experience offers artists a unique respite from day-to-day life and the sights and sounds of nature provide a haven for the development of creative work, given the proximity to the parks and surrounding natural areas. The program is also a conduit for community engagement with a diverse offering of programming and events throughout the residency period. The resident artist is required to actively engage the public through outreach for a minimum of 5 hours per week, on or off-site. Midwest artists residing in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin can apply online at https://www.domehouseart.org/apply. The 2024 program is scheduled to run from August 4 - September 29, 2024.

January 4, 2024—The Miller Art Museum will debut its first exhibitions of 2024, Vestiges of the Tide featured in the Museum’s first-floor main galleries and Charles L. Peterson in the Permanent Collection on the Ruth Morton Miller Mezzanine. The exhibits open to the public at 10 am on Saturday, January 20, 2024, and feature the work of Mary Porterfield, Ellen Holtzblatt, and the late celebrated Door County artist Charles L. Peterson (1927-2022). A free artist reception with Porterfield and Holtzblatt will be held later on Fri., March 1, 2024, in conjunction with The Studio Door, a curator/artist conversation. The exhibition will be on view for the public through April 6, 2024.

Vestiges of the Tide features drawings and paintings by Chicago-based artists Mary Porterfield and Ellen Holtzblatt. Porterfield works in the medical field as an occupational therapist and is also a talented portraitist committed to rendering her elderly, infirm subjects with images that address recurring struggles in healthcare. In unison, Ellen Holtzblatt presents works from her Song of Songs series, a collection of portraits of her elderly mother that convey that love, desire, and the need for human contact are universal.

“Together, the two create an emotionally charged exhibit that will offer viewers a powerful, poetic experience in the reality that many of us in Door County are facing,” says Helen del Guidice, Miller Art Museum curator.

'Support that Remains' by Mary PorterfieldMary Porterfield, Support that Remains, oil on Dura-Lar film, 2023.Porterfield’s figure drawings on transparent Dura-Lar and glassine papers are progressively layered creating images that address the internal struggles experienced by patients and caregivers that are outwardly hidden or forgotten. Using family members as models, she conveys the loss of identity that can occur as degenerative illnesses affect one’s ability to complete self-care and functional movement. The underlying layers represent the obscured sense of self that attempts to overcome those difficulties. The life-sized images, which are cut out and mounted to the wall, represent the substantiality of hardship and resilience.

October 19, 2023—The Miller Art Museum debuts its two final exhibitions of 2023, Newfangled: Modernism in the Permanent Collection and the Wildlife Biennial XXI, both opening to the public on November 4, 2023. An opening reception, free and open to the public, is scheduled for Friday, November 3 from 5:30 – 7:00pm. Light refreshments will be served and music will be provided by Craig Schultz. The exhibition will be on view through December 30, 2023.

Newfangled, presented in the museum’s first-floor main galleries, includes 34 works from the museum’s permanent collection that illustrate the modern art period and define particular characteristics and influences.

The modern art period, enduring between the 18th and 20th centuries, was marked by the gargantuan effects of the Age of Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution, and two world wars. This combination of revolutionary social changes served as a catalyst, prompting artists to reject traditional values in search of innovation. Modernism looked to the future with newfangled individualism, imagining an idealized society with a belief in universal truths.

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